Newcomers rise to a Welcoming Challenge!

Swift Current's Newcomers Get CIF Support

With over 250 newcomers making Swift Current their home each year, the Southwest Newcomer Welcome Centre (the Centre) is a busy place. This year, with help from the Community Initiatives Fund (CIF), the Centre is hosting the Swift Current Mad Dash to further familiarize new residents to their surroundings.

Newcomers face many challenges. Often unaccustomed to speaking English, our common language can make basic communication difficult. Our climate and weather may differ greatly from their former countries, and preferred foods such as fresh vegetatbles and seafood may not always be available. Employment, housing and health related issues, many times induced by diet or climate, can be huge hurdles for those new to this area and to our country.

Swift Current's newcomers visit the Centre for a host of reasons. This is where newcomers inquire about the labour market or citizenship, even language assessment. Some ask about schools for their families or about securing a mortgage or employment as they adjust to the new Saskatchewan culture. This winter they may also approach the Centre to join the Swift Current Mad Dash!

The Swift Current Mad Dash helps youth and families of all ages feel more at home in that city. Offered in both winter and spring, the race combines fun with information and welcoming activities, helping familiarize newcomers with long-standing residents. Those new to Swift Current learn some facts about their new city, are taught water survival skills, power walking, and a host of other activities to help increase their feeling of belonging.

"Mad Dash participants are exposed to activities and venues they would not generally experience on their own." says Icasiana de Gala, executive director of the Southwest Newcomer Welcome Centre. "Snow-related activities and walking along the creek bank of the Chinook Pathway are experiences that newcomers can repeat and won't easily forget."

"Then there's dancing, solving riddles and even a scavenger hunt that informs them about Swift Current's history. Participants are also introduced to volunteering and helping others through a shopping activity." explains de Gala. "All this is part of the Mad Dash to welcome our newcomers."

Partners in the Swift Current Mad Dash include Swift Current's Recreation and Parks, the Swift Current Museum, local cultural groups, schools, the Pioneer Co-op, and Swift Current's Great Plains College.

"Helping newcomers feel they belong in our Saskatchewan society, easing their challenges and helping them achieve a great quality of life here (in Saskatchewan) aligns well with the work of the Community Initiatives Fund." says Tracey Mann, executive director of the CIF.

 

(Photo Credit:  Southwest Newcomer Centre)

Posted in CIF News

Enews March 2014

March 2014

Is the Community Initiatives Fund in your community yet? 
We're investing in communities just like yours!

The Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) supports community projects that enhance the quality of life for children, youth and adults of all ages. Projects may involve childhood development, youth involvement, volunteer leadership, physical activities, Aboriginal inclusion, facility upgrades or renovations, and milestone or cultural community celebrations.

Our grants could be yours.

Feature Project: Newcomers Rise to a Welcoming Challenge!

Swift Current's Newcomers Get CIF Support

Helping integrate newcomers to Swift Current has an added feature these days. Swift Current's Southwest Newcomer Welcome Centre will run the Swift Current Mad Dash that combines physical activity with cultural awareness, some literary skills and a little bit of history. The CIF is supporting this welcome.

  • Newcomers to Swift Current receive a special welcome!
  • Over 50 volunteers help welcome more than 70 Swift Current newcomers.
  • CIF granted $8,368 for the Swift Current Mad Dash.
  • Learn more about the Mad Dash.
  • Contact the grant recipient. 
sc newcomers centre1 resized.jpg  
Above:  Mark Brooks, information services advisor, and Icasiana 
de Gala, executive director, Southwest Newcomer Centre. 
(
Photo Credit:  Southwest Newcomer Centre)
 

 

Program Application Deadlines

NEW Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) programming, announced in December, will be effective April 1, 2014.  Programming supports individual, family and community wellbeing through grants for childhood development, positive life choices, active living, community celebrations, facility upgrades, and volunteerism. The CIF's Physical Activity Grant Program, the Problem Gambling Prevention Program and the Community Vitality Program will end on March 31, 2014. Application deadlines:  April 1 and October 1 for Annual Grants. Summer Grant deadline:  February 1.  More.

Community Grant Program:  This program is broadened to include community support for active living, healthy growth and development of children and youth; individual, family and community wellbeing; supportive and inclusive communities; and community engagement and capacity building that includes cultural or centennial milestone celebrations.  More

Community Places and Spaces Program.  This program offers grants in support of community facility upgrades, retrofits, and related work to increase use and accessibility of community facilities. Facilities may include rinks, halls, arenas, playgrounds, ball diamonds, parks, and other areas or facilities. More

 


 

Resource Highlights

Celebrate National Volunteer Week!   April 6-12, 2014 is National Volunteer Week, time to recognize and celebrate volunteer dedication and efforts in your community and support Saskatchewan's strong reputation of volunteer leadership across Canada. Volunteer Canada'sCampaign Kit has downloadable tools and resources for planning a National Volunteer Week (NVW) campaign. You can also call the Volunt-Hear Hotline to recognize and thank your volunteers through NVW's new online video. The online NVW gift store offers volunteer gift suggestions like notebooks, lenscloths, tote bags, posters, thank you cards and the Heart of Volunteering pin. Help celebrate volunteer recognition week. 

E-book on Nonprofit Leadership.  The Muttart Foundation is offering a free e-book about leadership in the charitable sector. This thoughtful and practical guide is solid value for those who are in, or aspiring to be in, charitable leadership roles.


 

Get in Touch Today!

Register to regularly receive CIF’s e-news, program updates and application reminders. We’d like to hear from you, too!

 


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Saskatchewan’s Community Initiatives Fund is a Special Purpose Fund created through The Saskatchewan Gaming Corporation Act and accountable to the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport. Our programs are funded through a portion of the Regina and Moose Jaw casino profits.

PRIVACY POLICY

This Privacy Policy demonstrates our commitment to your privacy and the security and protection of your contact information. The CIF will not share or sell your contact information without your permission or unless ordered by a court of law. Our records indicate you have registered with the Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) or you have applied for a program grant through the CIF. You may unsubscribe by clicking unsubscribe.

Posted in CIF News

Canora's Aboriginals in Motion

Taking AIM Through Fun and Physical Activities

In January the Town of Canora's Crossroads Project Reconnect introduced the Aboriginals in Motion (AIM) Project that offers after-school physical exercises and life skills development to predominantly Aboriginal school-age youth and adolescents. The participants join together to learn life skills and techniques in a host of after-school fun in Canora, Saskatchewan. 

Activities through the AIM project include horseback riding and equine care, swimming and golfing, recreational fishing, canoeing, kayaking and more. Activities in winter months involve snowshoeing the Trans Canada Trail followed by open fire-roasted foods.

Other activities may include youthful games like Hide and Seek and Mantracker (a game that resembles the Canadian reality television series), and are balanced with positive adult and peer role modeling, the benefits of exercise, and a lot of basics about nutrition and food preparation.

"We talk about causes and effects of bullying, and discuss issues relating to safety and wise choices." says Shawn Tratch, the youth liaison worker and coordinator of the AIM project. "Sometimes these age groups have a lot of questions about life, but they don't know how—or who—to verbalize them with. Many times we can help."

Tratch speaks of cultural competence and the melding of cultures. He describes this concept as a gentle, gracious acceptance of others who have come to Saskatchewan from other areas of the world...those with different cultures and mindsets or family values...an acceptance he encourages throughout the delivery of all AIM activities.

This six month after-school project that began in early January, delivered twice per week, is attracting many. By mid-month, Tratch had signed up 12 participants from grades 1-4 and 18 from grades 5-12. He holds firm to his rule of one coordinator or volunteer for no more than six participants, so with a little help from volunteers, plans to involve at least 15 participants per week.

Overall results of the AIM project, according to Tratch, include the integration and acceptance of cultures, appropriate nutrition and exercise, positive peer and adult role modeling, bolstered self-esteem for participants, and the innate ability and wisdom to help these youth and adolescents to 'think before acting'.

Partners include the Sunrise Health Region (with a nutritionist and a community health nurse), the Town of Canora (for facilities and administration), the RCMP (for volunteering and positive adult role-modeling), the Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation (for snowshoeing and the Snow Shoe Festival), the Canora Junior Elementaray School and the Canora Composite School (for participants), the Ravenheart Farms (horses and equine instruction), and many volunteers.

The Community Initiatives Fund contributed $14,000 in support of these physical fitness and life skills activities. Canora is located 50 km (31 miles) north of Yorkton, Saskatchewan. 

 

          

Photo credit:  Shawn Tratch.

Posted in CIF News

Enews February 2014

February 2014

Is the Community Initiatives Fund in your community yet? 
We're investing in communities just like yours!

The Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) supports community projects that enhance the quality of life for children, youth and adults of all ages. Projects may involve childhood development, youth involvement, volunteer leadership, physical activities, Aboriginal inclusion, facility upgrades or renovations, and milestone or cultural community celebrations.

Our grants could be yours.

Feature Project: Canora's Aboriginals in Motion Project

Taking AIM Through Fun and Physical Activities

With more demand for this program than he can currently provide, Shawn Tratch with the Canora Child Action Plan's AIM Project offers after school activities and skills development for those 7-18 years of age through a project that combines learning with exercise and lots of fun. 

  • AIM provides after school exercise and new experiences for 7-18 year olds. 
  • CIF granted $14,000 to Canora Crossroads Project Reconnect for its AIM Project.
  • Partners include the Town of Canora, Sunrise Health Region, two Canora schools, the local Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation, and others.
  • Contact the grant recipient.
  • Learn more about Canora's AIM Project
canora shawn tratch 1.jpg canora shawn tratch.jpg
Physical activities through the Canora AIM Project include swimming and snow shoeing. Photo Credit:  Shawn Tratch.  

 

Program Application Deadlines

NEW Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) programming, announced in December, will be effective April 1, 2014.  Programming supports individual, family and community wellbeing through grants for childhood development, positive life choices, active living, community celebrations, facility upgrades, and volunteerism. The CIF's Physical Activity Grant Program, the Problem Gambling Prevention Program and the Community Vitality Program ends on March 31, 2014. Application deadlines:  April 1 and October 1 for Annual Grants. Upcoming Summer Grant deadline February 1.  More.

Community Grant Program:  This program is broadened to include community support for active living; healthy growth and development of children and youth; individual, family and community wellbeing; supportive and inclusive communities; and community engagement and capacity building that includes cultural or centennial milestone celebration.  More.

Community Places and Spaces Program:  This program offers grants in support of community facility upgrades, retrofits, and related work to increase use and accessibility of community facilities. Facilities may include rinks, halls, arenas, playgrounds, ball diamonds, parks, and other areas or facilities. More.

 


 

Resource Highlights

Strengthening Organizations Seminars Series (on Wednesday's in February).  Imagine Canada offers a webinar series on key issues related to operating charities and nonprofits beginning February 5 with an integrated framework for earned income and social enterprise. OtherFebruary webinars include aspects of:  Transparency and impact, Receipting, Fundraising and Gifts, and Corporate Community Partnerships.

Community Grant through Heart and Stroke Foundation. The Saskatchewan Heart and Stroke Foundation through its My Healthy Community Grant Program offers up to $4000 as a grant to Saskatchewan groups and organizations for projects that make a healthy community difference and focus on children, youth and families. Individuals and organizations in Saskatchewan wanting to make healthy changes in their communities should apply by March 3, 2014.

Anti-Spam Regulation Exempts Charities.  New regulations through the Government of Canada relating to portions of Canada's Anti-Spam Law now exempt registered charities using commercial electronic marketing when the primary purpose of the communication is to raise money for the charity. This means registered charities can continue to use electronic communications to raise money for their cause without incurring significant new costs or risks. 

Saskatchewan Event Hosting Program.  

211 Saskatchewan is a Saskatchewan-based website that offers a comprehensive reference service for Saskatchewan government, community, social and health services.


 

Get in Touch Today!

Register to regularly receive CIF’s e-news, program updates and application reminders. We’d like to hear from you, too!

 


FacebookTwitter

 

Saskatchewan’s Community Initiatives Fund is a Special Purpose Fund created through The Saskatchewan Gaming Corporation Act and accountable to the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport. Our programs are funded through a portion of the Regina and Moose Jaw casino profits.

PRIVACY POLICY

This Privacy Policy demonstrates our commitment to your privacy and the security and protection of your contact information. The CIF will not share or sell your contact information without your permission or unless ordered by a court of law. Our records indicate you have registered with the Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) or you have applied for a program grant through the CIF. You may unsubscribe by clicking unsubscribe.

Posted in CIF News

No Hesitation in Hazlet

The community's combination of leadership, determination and deep-set pride has built the foundation for a sustainable future in Hazlet, Saskatchewan. Grants through the Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) have contributed along the way.

It all began with a single goal:  for Hazlet to offer its residents vibrant and sustainable quality of life and be a place where anyone would want to live. This unified focus began almost five years ago with the R.M. of Pittville #169 and the Village of Hazlet partnered for actions to place Hazlet permanently on the Saskatchewan map.

Community development with CIF grant support began to take shape through a community arts project involving high school students, renovations to the Hazlet train station and Chinook Regional Library, and development of a museum. Then came the summer Kamps for Kids and an after school program, closely followed by an addition to the Hazlet rink.

Community celebrations also recently marked Hazlet's Centennial homecoming and featured 50 years for Hazlet's regional park. The Hazlet Gets Active physical fitness program was started and a new school playground was installed in 2013. The fitness program is affordable and it provides the venue for an active, inclusive community social life. It also accomomodates training for local recreational enthusiasts to teach the classes.

"We're now seeing the impact of these projects and programs here in Hazlet, and we're becoming known for our community innovation and cooperation." says Lindsay Alliban, Hazlet's economic development officer. "Our day care is thriving, the school is growing—when closure was threatened a few years back—families are coming back home and new families are moving here." Alliban explains that Hazlet's population of 100 has recently increased by 10 per cent and indicates that momentum will continue as they further engage their growing population.

"We have great quality of life in our thriving community, and can offer some services and opportunities usually only available in larger centres." says Alliban. "We have (even) more plans, lots of volunteers, a belief in ourselves...and the CIF. That's all we really need!"

Posted in CIF News
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